With this exhibition/event, organised in collaboration with the Giacometti Foundation, the LaM invites you to explore the body of work produced by one of the 20th century’s greatest artists.

Inscribed in the collective imagination, Alberto Giacometti’s fragile elongated sculptures render the profiles of men and women either motionless or captured in movement.
Brought together for the exhibition, over 150 masterpieces reveal the unparalleled career of one of the 20th century’s most legendary modern artists.

Dates:
13.03 > 11.06.2019

Times:
Tuesday to Thursday from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Fridays from 1 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Sundays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
On public holidays and Mondays during Zone B school holidays, the exhibition will be open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (except 1 May: closed)

The permanent exhibition galleries in which counterpoints to the Giacometti exhibition are presented open at 10 a.m. from Tuesday to Sunday.

Admission fees*:
Full fee: €11
Reduced fee**: €8

*Excluding administrative fees
**Upon presentation of documentary proof less than 3 months old and/or currently valid
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Tête sculptée de la mère d'Alberto Giacometti
Annette Giacometti, Alberto Giacometti modelant un buste de Yanaihara dans l’atelier, septembre 1960. © Fondation Giacometti, Paris, 2018. © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti, Paris + Adagp, Paris), 2019
Early years and surrealism

After studying at Geneva’s School of Fine Arts, Giacometti moved to Paris in 1922, where he enrolled in Antoine Bourdelle’s studio and immersed himself in cubism, which influenced his early work. He developed a passion for ancient statuary, Egyptian in particular, as well as for African and Oceanian arts. Non-western arts helped him turn his back on sculptural relief, encouraging him to flatten out forms and employ a combination of signs to represent facial features.
He came to the notice of the surrealists in 1929 and became their travelling companion for a few years. Some of his most disturbing works date from this period, creations that might have made their way out of some threatening dream: sculptures evoking cruel, mysterious game boards, “cages” peopled with strange figures and “unpleasant objects” imbued with strong sexual connotations.

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Tête sculptée de la mère d'Alberto Giacometti
Alberto Giacometti, Tête de la mère (plate), 1927. Fondation Giacometti, Paris. © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti, Paris + Adagp, Paris), 2019
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"Boule suspendue" d'Alberto Giacometti
Alberto Giacometti, Boule suspendue, 1930-1931. Fondation Giacometti, Paris. © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti, Paris + Adagp, Paris), 2019
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"Objet désagréable à jeter" d'Alberto Giacometti
Alberto Giacometti, Objet désagréable à jeter, 1931. Fondation Giacometti, Paris. © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti, Paris + Adagp, Paris), 2019
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"La Femme cuillère" d'Alberto Giacometti
Alberto Giacometti, Femme cuillère, 1927. Fondation Giacometti, Paris. © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti, Paris + Adagp, Paris), 2019
Image
"Le Nez" d'Alberto Giacometti
Alberto Giacometti, Le nez, 1947 (version de 1949). Fondation Giacometti, Paris. © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti, Paris + Adagp, Paris), 2019

A sculpture is not an object,
it is an interrogation, a question,
an answer.

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Alberto Giacometti

Alberto Giacometti

Return to the sitter

Giacometti left André Breton’s movement in 1935 and turned his attention back to the human form and portraiture, which were to remain central to his interest until his death in 1966. Friends and family, collectors, intellectuals and famous names succeeded each other in his studio. Confronted with the problems of creation, Giacometti, ever dissatisfied, was caught up in an endless struggle with his materials. Resemblance to the living sitter remained a central concern in his painted and sculpted portraits.
In order to overcome his inability to depict the sitter as he perceived him or her, he called on the help of artists and civilisations that had preceded him, paying particular attention to Ancient Egyptian statuary. Several of his most emblematic works show its influence.

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"Tête de Diego" par Alberto Giacometti
Alberto Giacometti, Tête de Diego, vers 1937. Fondation Giacometti, Paris. © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti, Paris + Adagp, Paris), 2019
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"Annette assisie dans l'atelier" par Alberto Giacometti
Alberto Giacometti, Annette assise dans l’atelier, 1960. Fondation Giacometti, Paris. © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti, Paris + Adagp, Paris), 2019

 

The human form reduced to its essentials

After the Second World War, Giacometti developed the model human form he is best known for. Extremely elongated and fragile, men and women, motionless or captured in movement, come into being, alone or in groups.
His paintings from the 1950s and 1960s also depict ghostly figures set in a space halfway between the studio view and the world of dreams, a parallel universe where humankind survives as best it can.

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Les femmes de Venise d'alberto Giacometti
Alberto Giacometti, Les femmes de Venise, 1956. Fondation Giacometti, Paris. © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti, Paris + Adagp, Paris), 2019


 

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"L'homme qui marche" d'Alberto Giacometti
Alberto Giacometti, L’homme qui marche I, 1960. Fondation Giacometti, Paris. © Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Giacometti, Paris + Adagp, Paris), 2019

General Curatorship:

Catherine Grenier, Director of the Giacometti Foundation and President of the Giacometti Institute
Sébastien Delot, Director/Curator of the LaM

Curatorship:

Christian Alandete, Artistic Director of the Giacometti Institute
Jeanne-Bathilde Lacourt, Curator responsible for modern art at the LaM

Patrons and partners

The exhibition enjoys the special support of

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Logo MEL

 

the main sponsorship of

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Logo Fondation Crédit Mutuel
 

and partnerships and related sponsorships by

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Logo Beobank

and

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Logo R&E

 

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